June 20, 2017

Open Letter to a Green Mama

A landfill in Poland

Image via Wikipedia

Dear Green Mama,

I just bought diapers. They are for your new baby. As a childfree woman this is an exceptional and eye-opening day for me. Thank you for taking the time to research the environmental impact of having a child and choosing to use cloth diapers instead of disposables. And thank you for educating me on the new technology of the old standard cloth diapers. Gone are safety pins and saggy rubber pants. Cloth diapers are now made of wool, bamboo, unbleached hemp, and cotton with snug waterproof covers in every color in the Crayola box. You also told me about the burden of disposable diapers on our landfills:

“An average child will go through several thousand diapers in his/her life. Since disposable diapers are discarded after a single use, usage of disposable diapers increases the burden on landfill sites, and increased environmental awareness has led to a growth in campaigns for parents to use reusable alternatives such as cloth or hybrid diapers. An estimated 27.4 billion disposable diapers are used each year in the US, resulting in a possible 3.4 million tons of used diapers adding to landfills each year.” (Source Wikipedia)

There has been much debate over landfill for disposable diapers vs. water usage for cloth diapers. Which is better for the environment? Bleached industrial cotton is terrible for the environment and so is using a washing machine and detergent. However, if you use a full load (pardon the pun) and green laundry products they are better both baby and the world.

Fact: The use of cloth diapers goes up in hard economic times. Parents will spend between $2,000 and $3,000 before potty training on each child vs. $300 for cloth, and the cloth diapers can be recycled and reused for additional children. (Or how about skipping that next child to save some money and the environment?)

But are the cloth diapers better for baby? Many experts believe that potty training is easier for kids with cloth diapers because they can actually feel when they are wet. The fabrics are also free of chemicals and are relatively easy to use.

Back to Green Mama. Thank you also for having a “green shower” free of wrapping paper, decorative paper bags, and plastic bows. Instead, presents will come in reusable baskets and “wrapping” will include cloth diapers with reusable bows. Just during the holidays alone wrapping paper makes up four million tons of waste. I love the idea of eliminating wrapping paper and using cloth instead of disposable. This is one idea that we can all make part of our routine. Just a suggestion, you may not want to wrap your gifts for the childfree in cloth diapers.

Dear WNKers, What do you buy your friend’s babies for gifts?

Related articles
Enhanced by Zemanta

Comments

  1. If I wasn’t already squeamish beyond squeamish about doo-doo dabbed disposable diapers (I was… and am!) this landfill situation has REALLY made me feel crappy! The green alternative (traditional cloth nappies) sounds good on paper, but that’s one load of laundry I’d dread washing. Reason #1972 why no kids. 😉

  2. Yay for cloth dipes! We even traveled with them, believe it or not. And in the early days, I was a whiz with pins. 🙂
    George: I promise you, it isn’t terribly pleasant dealing with anybody’s butt , but one of the more amazing things in life is that nature equipped parents with a high tolerance for their *own* kid’s crap. It simply isn’t as nasty as anybody else’s…at least when they’re little.
    Oh and I concur–cloth makes potty training easier. M&Ms are also a good motivational tool!

  3. Perhaps that’s nature’s way of preparing parents for all the crap they’ll be dealing with once their little angels and cherubs grow up into teenagers! 😀

Trackbacks

  1. […] footprint by having green babies. In the past I’ve mentioned buying cloth diapers for my favorite green mama. And I just bought a personal website for a Christening gift. Unusual? Yes. Green? […]

Post a comment!